Career spotlight: working in corporate communications

September 6, 2011 – When people ask me what type of job I’m looking for, I respond a position in corporate communications. More often than not, they look at me like I’m speaking another language.

Perhaps they’d better understand a role in employee communications, external communications or marketing communications, which are all part of the corporate communications world and more easily understood.

For those seeking a career in corporate communications, here’s how I would describe the role:

Employees are a corporation’s most important resource because the impression they leave with its customers can make or break a business. Therefore, communicating with them on a regular basis, whether it’s to update policies and procedures or share the latest company news, is crucial. It is the duty of the corporate communicator to work with managers and executives to help prepare these communications.

Effective corporate communication involves a clear message and the appropriate method of delivery. Finding the right way to deliver the message can be a challenge because some receivers will listen, others will misunderstand the message and some will ignore it altogether.

Large and small corporations alike have struggled with finding the best way to communicate to their employees. The most common method in today’s business environment is sending e-mail or posting the message to the company’s intranet. But it’s crucial to develop new ways to deliver communications to garner more attention. New technology has made it easier with the creation of Podcasting (audio) and vodcasting (video) to present messages in a more natural form. Most people would rather listen or watch a message than read it, especially if it’s lengthy.

Corporate communication can also serve as a liaison between a corporation and its customers. This type of communication is more commonly referred to as public relations or advertising.

So there it is in a nutshell, although it barely scratches the surface. Now, next time someone asks, I can refer him or her to my blog.

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