A tiny house, a covered bridge, and a tree

October 28, 2013 – When the trains once passed by, this was a most likely a station house that sold tickets. Now it’s a home to an interesting looking fellow with a long beard. That’s who I see walking around the place when I pass, anyway. The picture may be deceiving; this is a tiny building, and perhaps the smallest home I’ve ever seen. It’s located in Beth Ayres, Pa., in Montgomery County. Look at the shadows of the tree on the side. Morning shadows are always surprising.

small house

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Pennsylvania is home to more than 200 covered bridges, more than any other state, making the Keystone State the covered bridge capital of America. Here’s a shot of the Van Sandt Bridge in Solebury Township in Bucks County, Pa. near Washington Crossing State Park. Constructed in 1875, the bridge is 86 feet long, and according to several paranormal groups who have investigated the area, it is also haunted. That’s not surprising since the bridge is 10 minutes south of New Hope, Pa., said to be among the most haunted places in the United States.

bridge

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Autumn colors make a beautiful photograph, and while we’re past peak season, this shot taken on River Road just past the Black Bass Hotel in North Bucks County, shows that some leaves are more determined than others. They almost seem painted on, as they appear perfectly placed on the branches.

tree

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17 thoughts on “A tiny house, a covered bridge, and a tree

  1. I love the red roof against the blue sky…. and the autumn photo is beautifully done. The leaves DO look intentionally placed and with the disarray of the little branches it becomes an abstract piece. I love it. Kudos to you. Would you email that picture to me.? I am looking for interesting pictures to paint.

  2. Jane – Thought you might be interested in a little history on the house…at least as I know it… My grandparents lived in this house during my childhood…( I am 53…), and my memories of it are magical.
    The entire house shook when trains passed, and many a penny lost their lives…or at the least their circular soul…under the passing wheels. And as another blog reader commented, the house indeed had a ghostly inhabitant. My grandmother’s Persian car used to sit at the bottom of the stairs and watch someone descend the spiral staircase, her head bobbing with each step and following the invisible figure into the tiny kitchen. I don’t remember ever being scared by this phenomena. Somehow, they managed to get a Wurlitzer organ up to the second story, and when the organ was turned off, a “bucket” – (as Helen called it), used to make special effect sounds used to spin on it’s own and make a funny whirring sound… Can’t remember any other odd events at the moment… Not sure if my memory or the facts are distorted on this one, but I seem to recall that the house was once inhabited by a General Hooker during the Civil War. The story was he was fond of the ladies of a certain profession, and hence the moniker “hooker”, but I think that one’s a bit of a stretch…albeit a fine tale. Glad I came upon your blog… I write a bit as well…mostly to silence an over active brain, as most artists do. 🙂 …. Enjoy the New Year…

    • Wow, Jim I’m so glad you found my blog. Your story is fascinating. I used to pass that house twice a day for nearly 15 years driving from Fox Chase to Horsham where I worked and I always imagined my own stories about the house. Seems the truth is even better. What a great history you have! Do you know if anyone lives there now? Years ago I used to see a man walking around Bethayres and I think he may have lived there since I saw him enter once. He looked pretty interesting himself! Thanks for posting. And have a happy new year!!

      • Jane – Very glad I came upon your blog. I spent a little time over the New Year’s holiday reading your older posts. Love to discover people with similar interests….Tom Robbins….esoteric Bill Murray movies i.e. Broken Flowers, (Jim Jarmusch being one of my favorite directors and an acquaintance from the independent film world)… And of course writing… You have inspired me to make a reentry to the blogosphere…

        yahwehnutella.blogspot.com

        If you choose not to post the link, I understand.

        Finally, I do not know who currently owns the house. I heard that the company that owns the property behind it has stewardship of it in some manner…. I think it is historically registered as well. I have often passed it and thought to stop and knock, but I’ve always been afraid I’ll be looking down the barrel of a shotgun since the place has had some odd inhabitants… Look forward to your return to posting…

  3. Wow… what a cool response and what a coincidence (?) that Jim happened upon your blog …. we are all connected in one way or another. Happy New Year!

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  6. Hi, Jane… It’s Jim, from a couple years ago whose grandparents lived in the “tiny house”. Been meaning to post to tell you I found a watercolor of the house as I was walking through the Doylestown Arts Fest last year. Of course I had to buy it! And of course I told the artist, Ellie, the story of it’s history. I’ve lost your contact info, so if you could send me an email address I would appreciate it. Been enjoying catching up on your posts. I’ve been on the Appalachian Trail and am about 250 miles in….why any 55 year old would attempt this I don’t know…insanity…. But by the popular definition…doing the same thing over and over..etc..etc.., that makes no sense since this is something COMPLETELY different! Hope all is well…

    Bisousat.blogspot.com.

    Jim

    • Hi Jim, it’s great to hear from you! That’s pretty cool about the watercolor. I would have had to buy it, too. And it’s also very cool about the Appalachian Trail. I know a few folks who are doing the same, and manage to tackle a few large chunks each summer. It keeps life interesting. I’m anxious to hear the stories: janeconroy1209@gmail.com.

      Happy trails!

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