Weekly Photo Challenge: Partners

June 27, 2016 — This week’s photo challenge is partners.

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Happy birthday, Carly!

carly-simon_7June 24, 2016 — Carly Simon, an icon in the music industry over the past 50 years turns 71 tomorrow.

I’ve listened to this great singer/songwriter all of my life. Simon’s lyrics make me feel more emotion than any other female in the industry–although Joni Mitchell is a close second–and her music never grows old.

Through the years, I’ve read several books about her life, including her own Boys in the Trees, and I always learn something new and fascinating. But she wisely says that if you want to know anything about me, just listen to my lyrics.

In honor of her birthday, here is a blog I wrote five years ago to commemorate the same occasion. It contains eight of Simon’s song titles in the content. Can you find them?

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It’s no secret that I adore Carly Simon. She’s my favorite female singer/songwriter of all time. In fact, nobody does it better than she does.

The Grammy, Academy and Golden Globe winner who rose to fame during the 1970s is 66 today. A legend in her own time, she was inducted into the Songwriters Hall of Fame in 1994.

The biggest success of her career was the classic “You’re So Vain”, which prompted rumors worldwide as fans speculated who she was singing about when she crooned, “I bet you think this song is about you.” Likely suspects include Mick Jagger, Warren Beatty, Kris Kristofferson and Cat Stevens. Recent speculation, however, claims that it’s actually music and movie mogul David Geffen.

Simon, who was married to singer/songwriter James Taylor, suffers from severe stage fright and rarely tours. I was lucky enough to see her twice, once in the late 1970s and once in the late 1980s. With much anticipation, I waited for her to announce new tour dates for venues in my neighborhood when she recently toured with her two children, Sally and Ben. Alas, they didn’t come my way.

If you’re not familiar with Simon’s music, especially the wonderful deeper cuts on her albums, give her half a chance. You won’t be disappointed.

So join me in wishing Carly a Happy Birthday. It’s the right thing to do.

Songs for your dad and mine

maxresdefaultJune 17, 2016 – This Sunday, we celebrate Father’s Day. To honor that special man, here are my top five favorite songs about dads. They’re dedicated to my father, to all of the other wonderful fathers celebrating, and to those fathers who left us too soon.

Leader of the Band
Recorded on the double-album, “The Innocent Age”, Dan Fogelberg wrote and sang this song to his father in 1981. The song reminds me of my grandfather, but he was my dad’s dad, so it’s still appropriate.

Father and Son
Cat Stevens recorded “Father and Son” on “Teal for the Tillerman” in 1970. He originally wrote the song as part of a musical project set during the Russian Revolution. In the exchange between father and son, a boy wants to join the revolution against the wishes of his father.

Father and Daughter – Paul Simon
Paul Simon always says it right. He wrote this song for the animated “The Wild Thornberrys Movie” in 2001. It was nominated for an Academy Award and Golden Globe for Best Original Song.

Oh My Papa
This is one of my dad’s favorites; he used to sing it to his dad at every family party. It was recorded by Eddie Fisher in 1954. Originally titled “O Mein Papa” from 1939, it was a German song sung by a young woman remembering her once-famous clown father.

Daddy’s Little Girl
A classic written in 1906 and recorded by a number of artists in the 1950s, including Al Martino. My dad used to sing this to my sisters and me. It was commonly played while fathers danced with their daughters at weddings. Sadly, it’s a tradition that didn’t continue. I can’t remember the last time I attended a wedding that played the classic.

Happy Father’s Day!

Bloomsday is coming!

Bloomsday-On-BondiJune 10, 2016 – “How can you call yourself a writer if you’ve never read Ulysses?”

It’s a question my son asks me on occasion as if there is a law against putting pen to paper without first succumbing to the words of James Joyce.

The question is meant to inspire me to read the classic novel and push myself to achieve a similar feat. I’m certain I’ll never write another Ulysses, but I visited my local Barnes and Noble anyway to page through a copy. With a cup of tea in hand, I sat in the café and began to read.

Next week, we commemorate the 112th anniversary of Joyce’s first date with his wife-to-be Nora Barnacle. Their relationship was the inspiration for Ulysses, a story that takes place all in one day on June 16, a day that will be forever known as Bloomsday in literary circles, named for the character of Leopold Bloom, the protagonist of Ulysses. It seems Joyce was not only a serious writer but also a serious romantic.

To honor James Joyce and his beloved Nora, Philadelphia’s Rosenbach Museum and Library at 2008 Delancey Place will host their 24th annual Bloomsday celebration. Events will be scheduled at the museum, the Free Library of Philadelphia at 1901 Vine Street (on the Parkway), in Rittenhouse Square and other locations. Visit the website for dates and times.

To all the serious writers out there who have read Ulysses, I commend you. It may be considered a 265,000-word work of art written in a stream of consciousness style that was used by several writers in the early 20th century, but I wasn’t able to do it.