An Editor’s Eye

July 3, 2017 – No one is immune to making the occasional typo or grammatical error. Likewise, no one is immune to pointing out the error only to end up with egg on his or her face, although this is much less common.

I admit to feeling giddy when I find a typo in a book, a newspaper, or a magazine article. I may even take the time to report the issue. Never smugly, I handle it with care because as a communications manager, I have been on the receiving end of that confrontation, and whether you are the creator of the typo or the snitch who called it in, it can be a dangerous game.

For example, I carefully explained to the woman who runs the food cart on the corner of 6th and Chestnut Streets in Philadelphia, and in a prime spot across from Independence Hall and the Liberty Bell where the world is watching, that there was a typo on the sign hanging on the back of the cart. There is not a lot of copy on the sign; it should be an easy mistake to spot, even from the printer’s perspective, who isn’t typically accountable for typos. The other signs on the cart were fine, and the exact ice cold water sign is displayed with the correct punctuation on the front of the cart, so I’m not sure what went wrong.

The woman looked at me, offered a half-smile, and told me I owed her $1.50 for the bottle of water and soft pretzel. Somehow, I don’t think I am the first customer to bring it to her attention. I’m not sure if I should admire her restraint, or be appalled that she turned a blind eye. With a few strokes of whiteout, it would be a simple fix, and she wouldn’t have to go to the expense of printing a new sign.

Now, here is the egg on my face part of the story. Driving past a garden store a few years ago, I spotted what I believed to be the king of typos on a sign by the front door. “Hardy Mums”, it shouted in letters so bold you could see them a half a block away. I pulled over, promptly marched in to the store, and shared my discovery with the person behind the counter. My face turned red when she told me that Hardy was actually a brand name. I tried to laugh it off and save face by explaining that I’m not a gardener and I’ve never heard of the brand. I further explained that I thought the sign erroneously tried to portray “hearty”, as in sturdy enough to stand up to the brisk fall weather ahead. I was wrong.

There is a two-fold lesson here. Don’t be quick to judge a typo without knowing the all of facts. However, if you are certain there is an error, don’t ignore it. For your sake and mine, fix it.

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